Got Milk? Lessons Learned (Chapter 4)

25 years ago, marketers for the rather benign product “milk” sought to find ways to make the item more noteworthy. A brainstorming/strategy session led to the concept that maybe the best approach would be to discover what life would be like to live without it. Individuals were retained to participate in “deprivation” market research in which they were asked to go without milk for a period of time. The net discovery was that many people actually have emotional connections to milk, partly because of how many items are consumed along with it (cake, cookies, dinner, breakfast, etc.). The Got Milk? campaign was born.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Read the Fast Company article. Describe the connections between emotional attachment to the product (milk) and the endorsers (celebrities) in terms of creating an effective communication strategy.
  2. What the 50 top ads. Describe the role the humor plays in creating memorable, effective ads for an everyday product (i.e., how was the approach able to succeed at such a high level?).
  3. Watch the Neuromarketing video. Explain the role cognitive neuroscience can play in explaining the effectiveness of the deprivation approach to market research and the commercials that resulted.
  4. Identify other products (think mobile phones) that you believe might benefit from deprivation research and explain why it might work for them.

Altruistic Products and Buyer Behaviors (Chapter 3)

Consumer attitudes regarding marketing efforts that include altruistic activities vary widely, partly dependent on the nature of involvement. A straightforward sponsorship or relationship occurs when a for-profit company aligns with a non-profit charity. In another, the product’s uses serve positive purposes, such as is the case in green marketing of environmentally-friendly items or help in other ways such as Dawn’s use in cleaning birds covered by oil spills. A third approach involves creating products that can be marketed as the company directly engages in altruistic activities, such as is the case with Bombas and 4Ocean.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Watch the Bombas video. How might it affect consumer buyer behaviors (including the stage in the purchasing process that would be most affected)?
  2. Read the CNN story. How might such positive publicity influence consumers to try the product.  What role would the quality of the socks as advertised play in consumer purchasing decisions?
  3. Watch the 4Ocean video posted on the website. How is it designed to influence consumer buyer behaviors?
  4. Read the Forbes 4Ocean story. How does the product line offered by 4Ocean differ from the Bombas socks approach? Which do you think has a better chance of succeeding over time? Why?

Cinnabon and Co-Marketing (Chapter 2)

The first Cinnabon bakery opening in Seattle, Washington in 1985. Since that time, the company has enjoyed strong growth in freestanding locations in more than 50 countries. A second approach has been co-marketing programs with other providers. Two such companies include Pizza Hut and Schlotzky’s.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Visit the Cinnabon website. Can you find mentions of the company’s relationships with Pizza Hut and Schlotzky’s? Should the connection be more strongly emphasized? Why or why not?
  2. Watch the independent review. How might the two companies (Pizza Hut and Cinnabon) take advantage of favorable reactions to the co-marketing effort?
  3. Watch the Schlotzky’s ad. Does Cinnabon receive the proper amount of attention, or should it be highlighted more?
  4. The QSR analysis is favorable to the connection between Schlotzky’s and Cinnabon. Explain how this co-marketing effort might take advantage of the strengths of both brands.

GEICO’s Contest – Evaluation (Chapter 15)

GEICO enjoys a long history of creating memorable and funny commercials for those seeking insurance. The company recently launched an innovative approach — a contest in which viewers would vote for their favorite ads from the past. Winners receive prizes as well as the opportunity to appear in an upcoming GEICO commercial. To enhance interest, the company began running ads from the past to help remind consumers of the various ads.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Watch the first two videos launching the campaign. What types of message evaluations should the marketing team use to evaluate these messages?
  2. Watch the Hump Day commercial. Do your remember it? Did it change your opinion about GEICO at the time it ran?
  3. Watch the Caveman commercial. What is your response to it?  Do you believe evaluations of the campaign suggested it was successful? Why or why not?
  4. What risks might Geico take in promoting a series product such as insurance in a humorous way? What type of evaluation techniques would help GEICO’s marketing team in answering that question?

Johnson & Johnson (Chapter 2 and 13)

The Johnson & Johnson corporation produces and sells a variety of items related to personal care. Company leaders have long emphasized socially responsible, ethical activities. Recent events have created great concern for those in the organization. A lawsuit decision generated substantial negative publicity to which the company was quick to respond. The long term impact of the situation remains to be determined.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Read the New York Times Lawsuit Story. Assess the level of damage you believe the article creates.
  2. Read the American Cancer Society’s article regarding talc. Does it help or hurt the cause of Johnson & Johnson in responding to the negative event?
  3. View the online response from Johnson & Johnson. Do you think the material will be effective in reducing the impact of the lawsuit story?
  4. Read the Canadian Press story. How does it expand the image problem Johnson & Johnson has encountered? How should Johnson & Johnson respond?

McDonald’s Scholarship Program (Chapter 13)

McDonald’s has in the past presented commercials noting that, for many people the company provided their first job opportunity. Building on this background, the organization’s HACER® National Scholarship program has generated considerable goodwill.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Visit the McDonald’s website for the HACER program. What is the target audience for the message?
  2. View the McDonald’s video. YouTube states the program should be of special interest to Hispanic students. How could the company strengthen the appeal of the program using other marketing communication tactics?
  3. Watch the McDonald’s commercial. Who is in the target audience for the message? What type of appeal is used?
  4. Read the Denver Post article. Describe how the McDonald’s program combines public relationships, a sponsorship program, and standard commercial advertising into a single package. Can you think of another company that has used a similar approach? If so, which one, and how did it work?

Sad News To Report

To visitors of the blog.

Dr. Kenneth E. Clow passed away on November 22 at his home in Monroe, Louisiana.

He will be missed by all.

I have taken over the responsibility of adding new posts to the blog and will continue in the near future.

We had been working to finalize the 9th edition of Integrated Advertising, Promotion, and Marketing Communications, and expect it will publish on schedule.

Thank you for the support of our work.

 

Donald Baack

Digital Product Sampling (Chapter 12)

Methods for providing free samples to consumers continue to evolve. Beyond store visit approaches, many companies now provide samples via the internet–some for free and some in exchange for consumer information.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Watch the Ambient video and read the College Sampling tips. Are these “traditional” approaches to sampling, or do they apply equally well to online sampling programs?
  2. Visit the Vonbeau site. Are these truly “free” samples, or do you need to provide personal information in order to obtain the items?
  3. Do you think people will be willing to give personal information in exchange for samples? What reservations might people have about such an approach?
  4. Visit the Freebies website. How does it differ from other free sample websites? (You can use Google to find other sites.)
  5. Do you think online samples are superior to simple direct mail sampling programs?  If so, how?

Shazam! (Chapter 11)

The world of data analytics has evolved dramatically in the past decade, in areas as diverse as sports, politics, and business. Effective IMC programs cannot ignore this important aspect of an overall marketing approach.

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Watch the video regarding Shazam. What benefits does this company offer to client companies?
  2. In the two videos featuring Einstein Analytics, how does this organization approach customer relationship management?
  3. What advice does the Entrepreneur article offer regarding data analytics and customer contacts?
  4. Would the features and benefits of these data-analytic programs be best suited to certain types of companies, sizes of firms, or industries?  If so, how?

Snapchat Challenge (Chapter 8)

Many marketers are familiar with the difference between a fad and a fashion. Fads are typically more temporary and subject to rapid change.  In the past year, Snapchat has experienced some major challenges.  Are they endemic of fad or fashion with regard to the use of social media?

Resources:

Discussion Questions:

  1. Watch the two videos regarding problems with Snapchat. How might they affect advertisers thinking about using the site?
  2. Go to Snapchat. Have the problems been resolved?
  3. Read the story regarding Snapchat stock problems and the one regarding social media trends.  Can any of these trends help Snapchat rebound from its difficulties?
  4. If you were a marketing/advertising employee of a competing site, such as Instagram, would you highlight Snapchat’s problems or simply stress your site’s strengths? Defend your answer.